Totally 80s: Pegged jeans

Welcome the next installment of my year-long look back at the decade that was ruled by big hair and bigger egos. Every other week I’ll be covering pop culture tidbits from the 1980s, sharing memories, choking on the ridiculousness, and maybe offering an insight or two into what made the 1980s so great/bad/silly. Serving as my inspiration are two lists from Buzzfeed, and I’ll include links to the original list items in each post. So throw on your neon windbreaker, lace up your hi-tops, and adjust your Wayfarers, because this DeLorean is taking off! (Ugh. Did I really just type that? Gag me with spoon, seriously.)

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List item #23 from 50 Things only ’80s Kids Can Understand

Taking that little extra time in the morning to get the perfect peg on your jeans.

Sorry, but this trio needs at least one pair of slouch socks to be legit.

Sorry, but this trio needs at least one pair of slouch socks to be legit.

It’s been said that influence in fashion occurs in thirty-year cycles. So in sixties fashion you’ll find influences from the 1930s; in seventies fashion, you’ll find influences from the 1940s; and so on. This isn’t a hard and fast rule, and every generation has its outliers and trendsetters, but I kind of believe it when it comes to the clothing and styles with which I grew up. Not that I was a fashionista (one was not going to find the latest trends in thrift store and Sears), but there was definitely a time when the clothes of my 1980s peers had 1950s flair. Blame it on the tenth anniversary of Grease in 1988, maybe? Whatever it was, from poofy ponytails to penny loafers, the 1950s was in, and yes, that, in a roundabout way included pegged jeans.

Thank god for instructions!

Thank god for instructions!

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The ebb and flow of my Star Wars fandom

cary:

Outside of video games, Star Wars has probably been the next most constant obsession in my life. After seeing Return of the Jedi in the theatre way back when, I was hooked. But as with any love, its intensity has waxed and waned between extended moments of high praise and low disapproval. With another Star Wars movie now on the way, and with things about it looking very promising, I’m slowly coming out of one of those low periods, and I find myself once again embracing everything that makes Star Wars so wonderful. And there was no better place for this inner monologue than Geek Force Network.

Originally posted on Geek Force Network:

Image by Flickr user Manuel Sagra

Image by Flickr user Manuel Sagra

In the last Full Force, we discussed fandom and what it means to be a fan.  It’s an interesting topic and one that’s been on my mind recently with two major Star Wars announcements arriving through the pipeline: that future Star Wars movies will (mostly) disregard the current expanded universe, and the reveal of Episode VII’s cast that includes the return of Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher, and Harrison Ford.

For the bulk of my years up through the turn of the millennium, I was a Star Wars fan. The first movie I ever saw in a movie theatre was Return of the Jedi, and it instantly hooked me. For years, Star Wars-related gifts were staples at birthdays and Christmases. When the movies appeared on TV, I had to watch them, without question. In time I had practically memorized original trilogy, from scenery…

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Saturday afternoons with an old-school trifecta

Once upon a time, there was a young girl who had a computer. It was big computer, a beige computer, a computer that had a cassette player attached to it, which was used to access “boring” things that her parents used, like documents and spreadsheets. But this computer also had not one but two disk drives (A: and B:) into which comfortably slid 5.25-inch floppy disks. And oh! What a selection of floppy disks were available to this young girl. They filled up two whole storage containers! And when quiet Saturday afternoons rolled around, after morning cartoons and a peanut butter and jelly lunch, before it was maybe time to start thinking about the possibility of doing homework, she flipped through those disks looking for something to play. No one in the house really used the discs, or so it seemed that way as they were rarely ever out of order – an order that she had long since memorized. Her parents didn’t play computer games (or didn’t in the daylight), and her siblings were too young for such taupe-colored technological PC wizardry.

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Taking a step back to look forward

cary:

In case you hadn’t noticed, I write about video games, a lot. Not a lot compared to some bloggers, but a lot for me. And because I’m the one to blame for starting this train, there are times when I feel that I have to keep it going no matter the cost. In the recent past, this has driven my gaming down a path strewn with debris from the outside. This approach doesn’t quell my inner desire to play as much as it makes me feel like I MUST play only because…I MUST! I MUST CONTRIBUTE TO THE COMMUNITY! That’s all well and good sometimes, but the feelings that comes with this self-fulfilling prophecy turn out to be hollow and meaningless. In this post I wrote for United We Game, I take a step back from my current reality to reflect on why I play games in the first place and to answer the question “what do I want from gaming?”

Originally posted on United We Game:

Image by Flickr user Ian Muttoo

Image by Flickr user Ian Muttoo

As the summer gets rolling, my time with games grows thinner and thinner. Just this past weekend I turned on the ol’ 360 to play a little South Park: The Stick of Truth for the first time in nearly 3 weeks. I picked up a couple new games in Steam and put in a few minutes of gameplay, but I’ve no idea when I’ll next have any substantial time to become further frustrated with Guacamelee or return to whatever the heck I was doing in The Witcher. Summertime has been like that for me for awhile – gaming has to take a backseat to things like vacations, renovations, work, and life in general. I’m not complaining, I’m used to the cycle by now, and I’ve even come to welcome it, this time “off.” With summer generally being a time scant of new game releases, it’s sometimes spoken…

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Totally 80s: Denise Huxtable/The Cosby Show

Welcome the next installment of my year-long look back at the decade that was ruled by big hair and bigger egos. Every other week I’ll be covering pop culture tidbits from the 1980s, sharing memories, choking on the ridiculousness, and maybe offering an insight or two into what made the 1980s so great/bad/silly. Serving as my inspiration are two lists from Buzzfeed, and I’ll include links to the original list items in each post. So throw on your neon windbreaker, lace up your hi-tops, and adjust your Wayfarers, because this DeLorean is taking off! (Ugh. Did I really just type that? Gag me with spoon, seriously.)

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

List item #32 from 53 Things Only 80s Girls Can Understand

The unrivaled style icon that was Denise Huxtable.

DH3

Don’t ask me how, but it works. (Though if you did ask me, I’d say it’s the shape that make the outfit work.)

I’m not afraid to say it. I was, and still am an unabashed fan of The Cosby Show. I watched the show religiously from its first, now-classic episodes when the Huxtables were in their odd little apartment/house until the appearance of young Olivia near the turn of the decade. Once high school was in full swing, I kept up with the show irregularly and mostly through summer re-runs. Though the show ended in 1992, I caught at various points during its afterlife in syndication and had a particularly nostalgic run with the Cosbys when the show was picked up by Nick At Night some ten or twelve years ago.  I’ve read and heard all the bad things people have had to say about the show over the years, and I just don’t give a damn about any of it. I love The Cosby Show. Period.

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Project 151: Slow going but making progress

My last Project 151 post was almost a month ago (seems like a year ago). Since several weeks have passed, you might assume that I’d have LeafGreen in the can by now, but the truth is, I’m faaaaar from done.

Four weeks equals five hours of gameplay. ...sounds about right for me.

Four weeks equals five hours of gameplay. …sounds about right for me.

When I do have time to submit to LeafGreen’s charms, it’s very hard to come out of that stupor! I get its addictive nature now — there’s just something to exploring and battling and capturing that make the game very hard to put down at a moments notice. Those few hours I managed to put in simply flew by!

Anyhoo, even though I’ve not played my Pokemon-flavored ass off over the past weeks, I think I’ve knocked out some important objectives. Here’s the rundown of where my progress stands today:

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Having a bloody fine time in Bloody Roar

In the past, when video game commercials popped up like rare and illicit gems on mainstream television, there was no turning away. You watched intently as Mario soared to the clouds and Sonic speedily captured ring after ring. Outside of catching games in action at the arcade or seeing them advertised in magazines, commercials were once the only ways to see games in actions before purchasing them. To boot, they had to be catchy, funny, and oftentimes plain ol’ weird in order to get people to pay attention. When the PlayStation arrived on the scene, Sony took “weird” to the extreme…er…I’m sorry…I mean XTREME, now with MORE XTREMENESS!!!® Some of their early commercials were downright loopy, even unsettling at times. One of the most memorable in this regard has to be the commercial for Bloody Roar.

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Relationships in Games: The Loner, The Rebel

cary:

Over on United We Game, I recently completed a trilogy of posts on relationships in games. Having played some varied titles of late, I considered the importance of the company we keep in game and how those relationships, virtual though they may be, affect the way we play. In this, the third installment, I explore the notion that in some games, the path alone may be the best one taken. If you’d like to check out the previous posts in the series, click below.
Relationships in Games: The Teammates
Relationships in Games: The Romance(s)

Originally posted on United We Game:

Image by Flickr user emalord

Image by Flickr user emalord

Sometimes the best relationships we have in games don’t involve other characters. Sometimes the road traveled alone is the best path, the most fulfilling path, the most sensible path.  For every game that offers plenty of opportunities for teamwork and romance, there are dozens of others where these choices don’t exist. Your character — the John Marstons, Nathan Drakes, Batmans, and Altaïrs – are alone in the world with nothing at their disposals except their wits and the person at the other end of the controller. Sure, you (the character) will interact with other characters during the game to various ends, but you (the player) don’t have a stake in those relationships. No matter what saintly or nefarious paths you follow, John Marston will always save his wife and son; Nathan Drake will always choose Elena; Batman will always save the city from the…

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